Native Animals

Lepidochelys olivacea

Olive Ridley Turtle
VU
Vulnerable
IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
2009
QR Code
SSN 21298
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Taxonomy

The taxonomic status is pending for approval

Gallery  

Description

The small sea turtle commonly known as Olive Ridley Turtle is one of four sea turtle species that are known to nest in Malaysia. In Malay, the Olive Ridley Turtle is called Penyu Lipas. It has more carapace scutes than the standard five vertebrals and four pairs of costal. Adults are mainly olive to grey above and white below while hatchlings are completely dark grey but the plastron brightens after several weeks (Das, 2010). This species prefers sandy or muddy coastal waters. It feeds on crabs, prawns, tunicates, jellyfish and other animals as well as algae. Females deposit between 80 to 160 eggs several time in a nesting season, occurring in most tropical seas.

Habits

  Part Habit
 
Oviparous   —   Reproduction through production of eggs that have membranes and/or shells.

Habitats

No Description Suitability Seasonality
1
Marine Intertidal → Sandy Shoreline and/or Beaches, Sand Bars, Spits, etc.
Suitable Unknown
2
Marine Neritic → Pelagic
Suitable Unknown
3
Marine Oceanic → Epipelagic (0 - 200 m)
Suitable Unknown
References : http://www.iucnredlist.org/technical-documents/classification-schemes/habitats-classification-scheme-ver3

Assessment

Year Published Assessment Red List Category Version
2009 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
Vulnerable (VU)
N/A
2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
Vulnerable (VU)
3.1
1982 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
Endangered (EN)
N/A

Biodiversity Experts

Profile
Amirrudin Bin Ahmad (Dr.)
Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT)
  • Amphibians
  • Dragonflies and Damselflies
  • Fishes
  • Reptiles
  • Biodiversity
  • Data Analysis
  • Digital Sequence Information (DSI)
  • Living Modified Organism (LMO)
  • Marine & Coastal
  • Protected Areas
  • Invasive Alien Species
  • PM
Charles Leh Moi Ung (Dr.)
Sarawak Museum Department (JMS)
  • Fishes
  • Turtle, Tortoise, and Terrapin
  • Crustaceans
  • Biodiversity
  • Science
  • SWK
Chen Pelf Nyok (Dr.)
Turtle Conservation Society of Malaysia (TCS)
  • Turtle, Tortoise, and Terrapin (Ecology)
  • Reptiles (Ecology)
  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation
  • Education
  • Environment
  • PM
Kaviarasu Munian (Mr.)
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM)
  • Reptiles (Ecology)
  • Amphibians (Ecology)
  • Fishes (Ecology)
  • PM
Lim Boo Liat (Dr.)
  • Reptiles (Ecology)
  • Rodents (Ecology)
  • Amphibians (Ecology)
  • Biodiversity
  • Ecosystems
  • Invasive Alien Species
Mohamad Rosni Bin Othman (Dr.)
Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT)
  • Amphibians
  • Coral Reefs
  • Turtle, Tortoise, and Terrapin
  • Amphibians
  • Law and Policy
  • Management
  • Marine & Coastal
  • PM
  • W
Mohd Abdul Muin Bin Md Akil (Mr.)
Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM)
  • Amphibians
  • Birds
  • Reptiles
  • Snakes
  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation
  • Evolution
  • Genetics
  • Molecular
  • Protected Areas
  • Climate Change
  • Invasive Alien Species
Teo Eng Wah (Dr.)
University of Malaya (UM)
  • Reptiles
  • Amphibians
  • Invasive Alien Species
PM - Peninsular Malaysia; SBH - Sabah; SWK - Sarawak; SEA - Southeast Asia; W - World;

References

Article
  1. Chan, E.H. (2006). Marine turtles in Malaysia: On the verge of extinction? . Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management 9 (2): pp. 175-184
  2. Chan, E.H., Liew, H.C. & Mazlan, A.G. (1988). The incidental capture of sea turtles in fishing gear in Terengganu, Malaysia. Biological Conservation 43 (1): pp. 1-7
Book
  1. Handbook on the Living Marine Resources of Malaysia Marine Park, 2011. Department of Marine Park Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Putrajaya, Malaysia. pp. 123.
  2. Malaysian Naturalist, Volume 74, Issue/No. 4, 2021. Malaysian Nature Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. pp. 311.
  3. Pesona Perikanan Malaysia, 2016. Jabatan Perikanan Malaysia.
  4. Beastall, C.A. & Chng, S.C.L. (2021). Identification of Commonly Traded Wildlife in Southeast Asia. TRAFFIC, Southeast Asia Regional Office, Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  5. Cox, M.J., Van Dijk, P.P., Nabhitabhata, J. & Kumthorn, T. (2010). A Photographic Guide to Snakes and Other Reptiles of Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore & Thailand. New Holland Publishers (UK) Ltd. pp. 144.
  6. Das, I. (2010). A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia. New Holland Publishers (UK), England. pp. 369.
  7. Kolby, J.E (2021). Identification Guide to Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles: Parts, Products and Derivatives in Trade. CITES Secretariat, Geneva, Switzerland. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  8. Mohammad Khairi, A (2007). Taman Negara Pulau Pinang: Sinar Mutiara Belantara. Jabatan Perlindungan Hidupan Liar dan Taman Negara, Malaysia. pp. 112.
  9. Saleem, M. (2007). Marine BioValley Universiti Malaysia Sabah. Universiti Malaysia Sabah. pp. 1-67.
  10. Vie, J.-C, Hilton-Taylor, C. & Stuart, S.N. (2009). Wildlife in a Changing World - An Analysis of the 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland. pp. 180. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
Chapter in book
  1. Das, I. & Norsham, S.Y. (2007). Status of Knowledge of The Malaysia Herpetofauna. In Chua, L.S.L., Kirton, L.G. & Saw, L.G. (Eds.), Status of Biological Diversity in Malaysia and Threat Assessment of Plant Species in Malaysia: Proceedings of the Seminar and Workshop, 28-30 June 2005. Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM). pp. 31-81.
  2. Gambang, A.C., Daud, A., Lim, A.P.K. & Osman, M. (2004). Fish Community of Pulau Layang Layang. In Mohamed, P.A. (Ed.), Marine Biodiversity of Pulau Layang Layang, Malaysia. Marine Research Station Layang Layang (MARSAL), Fisheries Research Institute, Department of Fisheries Malaysia. pp. 43-58.
Report
  1. 5th National Report to Convention on Biological Diversity. Ministry of Natural Resource and Environment, Malaysia. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  2. A Rapid Assessment on the Trade in Marine Turtles in Indonesia, Malaysia and Viet Nam. TRAFFIC. Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  3. Living Blue Planet Report. Species, habitats and human well-being. WWF, Gland, Switzerland. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  4. Burgess, M.G., McDermott, G.R., Owashi, B., Reeves, L.E.P., Clavelle, T., Ovando, D., Wallace, B.P., Lewison, R.L., Gaines, S.D. & Costello, C. (2018). Protecting Marine Mammals, Turtles, and Birds by Rebuilding Global Fisheries. American Association for the Advancement of Science, United States of America. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
Unpublish
  1. Checklist of Biodiversity of Setiu (2019)

Acknowledgements :- Ms. Aida Salihah Binti Abu Bakar, Ms. Ajla Rafidah Baharom, Mrs. Aziemah Binti Kinan, Mr. Badrul Amin Bin Jaffar, Ms. Mira Farzana Binti Mohamad Mokhtar, Ms. Noor Amira Aini Binti Noor Anwar, Ms. Norayuni Binti Ramlee, Ms. Norazah Binti Norddin, Ms. Nurfarhana Hizan Binti Hijas, Ms. Nurliyana Binti Abd Rahman, Mr. Tan Kok Kiat & Mr. Yasser Mohamed Arifin

Species Citation :- Lepidochelys olivacea. Malaysia Biodiversity Information System (MyBIS). Accessed via https://www.mybis.gov.my/sp/21298. [Retrieved 21 May 2022].

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