Malayopython reticulatus

Reticulated Python
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Taxonomy

The taxanomic status is pending for approval

Gallery  

Juvenile
Juvenile
Juvenile
Skin
Skin
Body

Description

Python reticulatus is commonly known as the Reticulated Python. The species does not grow as long but attains greater girth. Some records show that the snake is able to grow up to 8 m long and some have even recorded individuals more than 9 m long. Reticulated Python is easily recognised from its net-like pattern which is coloured green, yellow and black.

Reticulated Python is a constrictor and its diet includes medium to small mammals such as pigs, goats, and deer; waterfowl and nesting birds; and even human beings have been known to be its preys. They have a series of heat-sensing pits along their upper lip which they use to detect prey.

Reticulated Python has tan or yellowish-tan at the head and stout body. A network of black lines extends along the top of the body and down the sides where the lines widen and encircle white spots. This snake primarily inhabits humid forests up to 1,500m, but is also at home in orchards, agricultural lands and human habitation. This snake feeds any mammal it can overpower, ranging from mice to deer and pigs.

Location

by State Location
  • Johor 2
  • Kedah 4
  • Pahang 2
  • Perak 1
  • Sarawak 1
  • Terengganu 1
  • WP Kuala Lumpur 1
Based on publications, specimens, and images

Specimen

Collection Center Total
5

Biodiversity Experts

Profile
Amirrudin Bin Ahmad (Dr.)
Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT)
  • Amphibians
  • Dragonflies and Damselflies
  • Fishes
  • Reptiles
  • Biodiversity
  • Data Analysis
  • Digital Sequence Information (DSI)
  • Living Modified Organism (LMO)
  • Marine & Coastal
  • Protected Areas
  • Invasive Alien Species
  • PM
Chen Pelf Nyok (Dr.)
Turtle Conservation Society of Malaysia (TCS)
  • Turtles (Ecology)
  • Reptiles (Ecology)
  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation
  • Education
  • Environment
  • PM
Kaviarasu Munian (Mr.)
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM)
  • Reptiles (Ecology)
  • Amphibians (Ecology)
  • Fishes (Ecology)
  • PM
Lim Boo Liat (Dr.)
Academy of Sciences Malaysia (ASM)
  • Reptiles (Ecology)
  • Rodents (Ecology)
  • Amphibians (Ecology)
  • Biodiversity
  • Ecosystems
  • Invasive Alien Species
Mohd Abdul Muin Bin Md Akil (Mr.)
Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM)
  • Amphibians
  • Birds
  • Reptiles
  • Snakes
  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation
  • Evolution
  • Genetics
  • Molecular
  • Protected Areas
  • Climate Change
  • Invasive Alien Species
Teo Eng Wah (Dr.)
University of Malaya (UM)
  • Reptiles
  • Amphibians
  • Invasive Alien Species
PM - Peninsular Malaysia; SBH - Sabah; SWK - Sarawak; SEA - Southeast Asia; W - World;

References

Article
  1. Shahriza, S., Ibrahim, J., Ibrahim, N.H., Ismail, A., Hurzaid, A., Awang, Z. & Shahrul Anuar, M.S. (2013). An Addition of Reptiles of Gunung Inas, Kedah, Malaysia. Russian Journal of Herpetology 20 (3): pp. 171-180
  2. Ibrahim, J., Shahrul Anuar, M.S., Norhayati, A., Nor, S.M., Shahriza, S., Nurul 'Ain, E., Nor Zalipah, M. & Rayan, D.M. (2006). An Annotated Checklist of Herpetofauna of Langkawi Island, Kedah, Malaysia. Malayan Nature Journal 58: pp. 1-15
  3. Ibrahim, J., Awang, Z., Shahriza, S., Shahrul Anuar, M.S., Ibrahim, N.H., Hurzaid, A., Rahim, N.D.A., Min, M.A. & Ismail, A. (2012). Checklist of the Herpetofauna of Bukit Perangin Forest Reserve, Kedah, Malaysia. Sains Malaysiana 41 (6): pp. 691-696
  4. Chan, K.O., Van Rooijen, J., Lee Grismer, L., Belabut, D., Jamaludin, H., Gregory, R., Norhayati, A. & Mohd Abdul Muin, M.A. (2010). First report on the herpetofauna of Pulau Pangkor, Perak, Malaysia. Russian Journal of Herpetology 17 (2): pp. 139-146 — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  5. Lee Grismer, L., Chan, K.O., Grismer, J.L., Wood Jr., P.L. & Norhayati, A. (2010). A Checklist of the Herpetofauna of the Banjaran Bintang, Peninsular Malaysia. Russian Journal of Herpetology 17 (2): pp. 147-160
  6. Quah, E.S.H., Shahrul Anuar, M.S., Mohd Abdul Muin, M.A., Chan, K.O., Grismer, J.L. & Lee Grismer, L. (2011). Preliminary Checklist of the Herpetofauna of Jerejak Island, Penang, Malaysia. Malayan Nature Journal 63 (3): pp. 595-600
  7. Lim, B.L., Noor Alif Wira, O., Chan, K.O., Daicus, B. & Norhayati, A. (2010). An Updated Checklist of the Herpetofauna of Pulau Singa Besar, Langkawi, Peninsular Malaysia. Malaysian Applied Biology Journal 39 (1): pp. 13-23
  8. Lim, B.L. (1958). Colour Patterns of Some Malayan Snakes. Malayan Nature Journal 12 (3): pp. 116-118
  9. Lim, K.K.P. & Lim, L.J. (1999). The Terrestrial Herpetofauna of Pulau Tioman, Peninsular Malaysia. The Raffles Bulletin of Zoology Supplements (6): pp. 131-155
  10. Murphy, J.C., Voris, H.K. & Karns, D.R. (1994). A Field Guide and Key to the Snakes of the Danum Valley, A Bornean Tropical Forest Ecosystem. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society , Vol. 29 (7): pp. 133-151
  11. Norshaqinah, A., Muzneena, A.M., Senawi, J. & Norhayati, A. (2018). Distribution and abundance of vertebrate animal road-kills on Pulau Langkawi, Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia. Malayan Nature Journal. : pp. 9
  12. Quah, E.S.H., Mohd Abdul Muin, M.A., Nur Amira, A.R., Fatim Syakirah, M., Shahrul Anuar, M.S. & Lee Grismer, L. (2013). Species Diversity of Herpetofauna of Bukit Panchor State Park, Penang, Peninsular Malaysia. Malayan Nature Journal 64 (4): pp. 193-211
  13. Shahriza, S., Ibrahim, J., Shahrul Anuar, M.S. & Mohd Abdul Muin, M.A. (2012). Herpetofauna of Peta Area of Endau-Rompin National Park,Johor, Malaysia. Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science 35 (3): pp. 553-567
  14. Shahriza, S. & Ibrahim, J. (2014). Reptiles of Lata Bukit Hijau, Kedah, Malaysia. Songklanakarin Journal of Science and Technology 36 (1): pp. 37-44
  15. Moseley, M., Wyn, L.T. & Tshen, L.T. (2012). Fauna Reported from Batu Caves, Selangor, Malaysia: Annotated Checklist and Bibliography.. 39 (2): pp. 77-92
Book
  1. Guideline: Management of Snakebite, 2017. Ministry of Health Malaysia, Putrajaya, Malaysia. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  2. Guidelines for the Management of Snakebites, 2nd edition, 2016. WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia, New Delhi, India. pp. 206.
  3. Looking at Loagan - A Journey Into Loagan Bunut National Park, Sarawak, 2006. Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia. pp. 75.
  4. Snake Farm Exhibition, 2010. Snake Farm, Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute, The Thai Red Cross Society, Thailand. pp. 97.
  5. Sustainable management of the trade in reticulated python skins in Indonesia and Malaysia, 2016. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland. pp. 46. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  6. Meijaard, E., Garcia-Ulloa, J, Sheil, D, Wich, S., Carlson, K.M, Juffe-Bignoli, D & Brooks, T.M (2018). Oil palm and biodiversity : a situation analysis by the IUCN Oil Palm Task Force. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland. pp. 116. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  7. Shaharuddin, M.I., Che, H.H., Mohd. Puat, Dahalan, Jalil, M.S., Norhaidi, Y. & Latiff, A. (2005). Hutan Simpan Ulu Muda, Kedah: Pengurusan, Persekitaran Fizikal Dan Biologi. Jabatan Perhutanan Semenanjung Malaysia, Malaysia. pp. 310.
  8. Das, I. (2010). A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia. New Holland Publishers (UK), England. pp. 369.
  9. Das, I. (2012). A Naturalist's Guide to the Snakes of South-east Asia : Including Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Myanmar, Borneo, Sumatra, Java and Bali. John Beaufoy Publishing, Oxford, England. pp. 70-71; 160 pg.
  10. Hazebroek, H.P., Adlin, T.Z. & Sinun, W. (2011). Danum Valley: The Rain Forest. Natural History Publications (Borneo), Malaysia. pp. 615.
  11. Ismail, A.K., Teo, E.W., Das, I., Vasaruchapong, T. & Weinstein, S.A. (2017). Land Snakes of Medical Significance in Malaysia. Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Putrajaya, Malaysia. pp. 80. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) | eBook (EPUB) ]
  12. Rusli, N., Marlon, R., Lilley, R., Ekariyono, W. & Laister, A. (2016). Mengenal Ular Jabodetabek - Snakes of Jakarta and Its Surroundings. Ciliwung Reptile Center, Jakarta, Indonesia. pp. 168.
  13. Lee Grismer, L. (2005). Amphibians and Reptiles of the Tioman Archipelago, Malaysia. Forestry Department Peninsular Malaysia, Malaysia. pp. 215.
  14. Maimon, A. (2008). Biodiversity of Sungai Pulai: Ramsar Site, Johor. Earth Observation Centre, Malaysia. pp. 97.
  15. Abdul Rahman, A.R., Mohd Nasir, A.H., Mohamed Zin, Y., Richard, A.M. & Latiff, A. (2013). Banjaran Bintang Gunung Inas, Kedah: Pengurusan Hutan, Persekitaran Fizikal dan Kepelbagaian Biologi. Jabatan Perhutanan Semenanjung Malaysia, Malaysia. pp. 245.
  16. Suhaila, A.H. & Nik Ahmad Irwan Izzauddin, N. H. (2014). Biodiversity of Gunung Ledang Mountaineering The Nature. School of Biological Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia and Johor National Parks Corporation, Malaysia. pp. 165.
  17. Praveena, B.K. & Maria Arlene, J.A.S. (2013). Compendium of Facts and Figures. 2nd Edition. Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Malaysia. pp. 161.
  18. Ratnam, L. (1995). Windows on The Forest: Glimpses of FRIM for the Nature Loving Visitor, Issue/No. 1. Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Malaysia. pp. 143.
  19. Sibunruang, S., Suteparuk, S. & Sitprija, V. (2013). Manual of Practical Management of Snake-bites and Animal Toxin Injury. Bangkok: Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute, The Thai Red Cross Society, Thailand. pp. 88.
  20. T. Marina, T. Ibrahim & Shamsul, K. (2009). Kepelbagaian Biologi Flora, Fauna dan Nilai Ekonomi Hutan Simpan Tranum, Pahang. Jabatan Perhutanan Semenanjung Malaysia, Malaysia. pp. 140.
Chapter in book
  1. Inventori Hidupan Liar di Putrajaya. In Pelan Pengurusan Hidupan Liar Putrajaya. PERHILITAN & Perbadanan Putrajaya. pp. 1-52.
  2. Das, I. & Norsham, S.Y. (2007). Status of Knowledge of The Malaysia Herpetofauna. In Chua, L.S.L., Kirton, L.G. & Saw, L.G. (eds.) Status of Biological Diversity in Malaysia and Threat Assessment of Plant Species in Malaysia: Proceedings of the Seminar and Workshop, 28-30 June 2005. Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM). pp. 31-81.
  3. Ismail, A.K. (January 2015). Snakebite and Envenomation Management in Malaysia. In Gopalakrishnakone, P., Faiz, M.A., Fernando, R., Gnanathasan, C.A., Habib, A.G. & Yang, C.-C. (eds.) Clinical Toxinology in Asia Pacific and Africa. Springer. pp. 71-102.
Newsletter
  1. Ida Suraini, A.S. (2010, December). FRIM in FOCUS. Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM). Retrive May 06, 2016, from https://www.mybis.gov.my/art/134
  2. Ida Suraini, A.S. (2009, June). FRIM in FOCUS. Forest Research Institute Malaysia. Retrive November 18, 2015, from https://www.mybis.gov.my/art/139
Report
  1. Sabine, Schoppe (2008). Science in CITES: The biology and ecology of the Southeast Asian Box Turtle and its uses and trade in Malaysia. TRAFFIC Southeast Asia, Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]

Acknowledgements :- Mr. Ahmad Amir Firdaus Bin Mad Apandi, Ms. Aida Salihah Binti Abu Bakar, Ms. Ajla Rafidah Baharom, Ms. Aziemah Binti Kinan, Mr. Badrul Amin Bin Jaffar, Dr. Khairul Naim Bin Adham, Ms. Nor Liyana Binti Hassan, Ms. Norayuni Binti Ramlee, Ms. Nur Hazwanie Binti Abd Halim, Ms. Nurfarhana Hizan Binti Hijas, Ms. Siti Zubaidah Binti Abdul Latif, Mr. Tan Kok Kiat, Ms. Umairah Binti Ishak, Mrs. Wan Roniza Binti Ismil & Mr. Yasser Mohamed Arifin

Citation :- Malayopython reticulatus. Malaysia Biodiversity Information System (MyBIS). https://www.mybis.gov.my/sp/58057. Downloaded on 20 April 2019.

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