Invasive Animals

Trachemys scripta

Red-eared Slider Turtle
LC
Least Concern
IUCN Red List
ver 3.1, 2013
QR Code
SSN 09958
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Taxonomy

Gallery  

Adult
Adult
Adult
Adult
Adult
Adult
Adult

Description

Common slider or Red-eared Slider is a species of turtle belongs in family Emydidae. It gets its common name based on the small red stripe around its ears, and its habit of sliding off rocks and logs when startled. It also can be identified by the shape of its rounded carapace with nearly smooth outline (Das, 2010).

Generally, the hatchling has bright green with a pattern of yellow stripes and bars on the head, legs and carapace which becomes darken as it grows (Das, 2010) but the red blotch and fine yellow stripes remain recognizable on the head and limbs. The plastron is deep yellow with a round black spot on each scute. The side of the head bears an orange to blood-red elongated mark. Male is smaller than female, has less domed shells and greatly elongated nails on the front feet which used during courtship.

The Red-eared Sliders is listed as one of the worst invasive species.  It feeds on almost anything edible and grows rapidly. It causes negative impacts on the ecosystems they occupy because they have certain advantages over the native populations such as compete with local species for resources and habitats and carry a high risk of spreading diseases.

Habits

  Part Habit
 
Oviparous   —   Reproduction through production of eggs that have membranes and/or shells.

Habitats

No Description Suitability Seasonality
1
Artificial - Aquatic → Aquaculture Ponds
Unknown Unknown
2
Artificial - Aquatic → Canals and Drainage Channels, Ditches
Unknown Unknown
3
Artificial - Aquatic → Ponds [below 8 ha]
Suitable Unknown
4
Artificial - Aquatic → Water Storage Areas [over 8 ha]
Suitable Unknown
5
Wetlands → Bogs, Marshes, Swamps, Fens, Peatlands [generally over 8 ha]
Suitable Unknown
6
Wetlands → Freshwater Springs and Oases
Unknown Unknown
7
Wetlands → Permanent Freshwater Lakes [over 8 ha]
Suitable Unknown
8
Wetlands → Permanent Freshwater Marshes/Pools [under 8 ha]
Suitable Unknown
9
Wetlands → Permanent Rivers, Streams, Creeks [includes waterfalls]
Suitable Unknown
10
Wetlands → Seasonal/Intermittent Freshwater Lakes [over 8 ha]
Suitable Unknown
11
Wetlands → Seasonal/Intermittent Freshwater Marshes/Pools [under 8 ha]
Unknown Unknown
12
Wetlands → Seasonal/Intermittent/Irregular Rivers, Streams, Creeks
Suitable Unknown
13
Wetlands → Shrub Dominated Wetlands
Unknown Unknown
References : http://www.iucnredlist.org/technical-documents/classification-schemes/habitats-classification-scheme-ver3

Assessment

Location

by State Location
  • Selangor 1
  • WP Putrajaya 1
Based on publications, specimens, and images

Biodiversity Experts

Profile
Amirrudin Bin Ahmad (Dr.)
Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT)
  • Amphibians
  • Dragonflies and Damselflies
  • Fishes
  • Reptiles
  • Biodiversity
  • Data Analysis
  • Digital Sequence Information (DSI)
  • Living Modified Organism (LMO)
  • Marine & Coastal
  • Protected Areas
  • Invasive Alien Species
  • PM
Charles Leh Moi Ung (Dr.)
Sarawak Museum Department (JMS)
  • Fishes
  • Turtles
  • Crustaceans
  • Biodiversity
  • Science
  • SWK
Chen Pelf Nyok (Dr.)
Turtle Conservation Society of Malaysia (TCS)
  • Turtles (Ecology)
  • Reptiles (Ecology)
  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation
  • Education
  • Environment
  • PM
Kaviarasu Munian (Mr.)
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM)
  • Reptiles (Ecology)
  • Amphibians (Ecology)
  • Fishes (Ecology)
  • PM
Lim Boo Liat (Dr.)
Academy of Sciences Malaysia (ASM)
  • Reptiles (Ecology)
  • Rodents (Ecology)
  • Amphibians (Ecology)
  • Biodiversity
  • Ecosystems
  • Invasive Alien Species
Mohamad Rosni Bin Othman (Dr.)
Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT)
  • Amphibians
  • Coral Reefs
  • Turtles
  • Amphibians
  • Law and Policy
  • Management
  • Marine & Coastal
  • PM
  • W
Mohd Abdul Muin Bin Md Akil (Mr.)
Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM)
  • Amphibians
  • Birds
  • Reptiles
  • Snakes
  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation
  • Evolution
  • Genetics
  • Molecular
  • Protected Areas
  • Climate Change
  • Invasive Alien Species
Teo Eng Wah (Dr.)
University of Malaya (UM)
  • Reptiles
  • Amphibians
  • Invasive Alien Species
PM - Peninsular Malaysia; SBH - Sabah; SWK - Sarawak; SEA - Southeast Asia; W - World;

References

Article
  1. Shahirah-Ibrahim, N., Baizul-Hafsyam, B.S., Shafie, N.J. & Ahmad, A. (2018). Species Diversity of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises in Terengganu, Malaysia. Journal of Sustainability Science and Management (1): pp. 27
  2. Shahriza, S., Ibrahim, J., Ibrahim, N.H., Ismail, A., Hurzaid, A., Awang, Z. & Shahrul Anuar, M.S. (2013). An Addition of Reptiles of Gunung Inas, Kedah, Malaysia. Russian Journal of Herpetology 20 (3): pp. 171-180
  3. Allen, D.J., Smith, K.G. & Darwall, W.R.T. (2012). The Status and Distribution of Freshwater Biodiversity in Indo-Burma. : pp. 158 — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  4. Thomas, R.B., Ian, M.N. & William, J.H (2008). Relative Efficacy of Three Different Baits forTrapping Pond-dwelling Turtles in East-centralKansas. Herpetological Review 39 (2): pp. 186- 188
Book
  1. National Action Plan for Prevention, Eradication, Containment and Control of Invasive Alien Species (IAS) in Malaysia, 2014. Department of Agriculture, Malaysia. pp. 40.
  2. Norhayati, A. & Chong, M.H.N. (2016). Amphibians, Reptiles and Mammals of Putrajaya Lake and Wetland. Perbadanan Putrajaya, Malaysia. pp. 100.
  3. Das, I. (2010). A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia. New Holland Publishers (UK), England. pp. 369.
  4. Mark, Auliya (2007). An Identification Guide to the Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles of Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore and Timor Leste. TRAFFIC Southeast Asia, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. pp. 90.
  5. Nee, T. A. & Nordin, N. (2018). Compendium of Facts and Figures. 3rd Edition, Volume 3. Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Malaysia. pp. 174.
  6. Praveena, B.K. & Maria Arlene, J.A.S. (2013). Compendium of Facts and Figures. 2nd Edition. Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Malaysia. pp. 161.
Chapter in book
  1. Das, I. & Norsham, S.Y. (2007). Status of Knowledge of The Malaysia Herpetofauna. In Chua, L.S.L., Kirton, L.G. & Saw, L.G. (eds.) Status of Biological Diversity in Malaysia and Threat Assessment of Plant Species in Malaysia: Proceedings of the Seminar and Workshop, 28-30 June 2005. Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM). pp. 31-81.
Report
  1. Laporan Program Kajian Inventori dan Pengurusan Hidupan Liar Tahun 2017, Wilayah Persekutuan Putrajaya. Perbadanan Putrajaya & PERHILITAN, Malaysia.
  2. Morgan, J. (2018). Slow and Steady: The Global Footprint of Jakarta’s Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Trade. TRAFFIC, Southeast Asia Regional Office, Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  3. Pallewatta, N., Reaser, J.K. & Gutierrez, A.T. (2003). Prevention and Management of Invasive Alien Species: Proceedings of a Workshop on Forging Cooperation throughout South and Southeast Asia.. The Global Invasive Species Programme.
  4. Sabine, Schoppe (2008). Science in CITES: The biology and ecology of the Southeast Asian Box Turtle and its uses and trade in Malaysia. TRAFFIC Southeast Asia, Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]
  5. Sharma, D.S.K. (1999). Trade Review: Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Trade and Utilisation in Peninsular Malaysia. A Traffic Southeast Asia Report. TRAFFIC Southeast Asia, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. — [ Adobe PDF (PDF) ]

Acknowledgements :- Mr. Ahmad Amir Firdaus Bin Mad Apandi, Ms. Aida Salihah Binti Abu Bakar, Ms. Ajla Rafidah Baharom, Ms. Aziemah Binti Kinan, Mr. Badrul Amin Bin Jaffar, Mr. Kaviarasu Munian, Ms. Mira Farzana Binti Mohamad Mokhtar, Ms. Noor Amira Aini Binti Noor Anwar, Ms. Nurfarhana Hizan Binti Hijas, Mr. Tan Kok Kiat & Mr. Yasser Mohamed Arifin

Citation :- Trachemys scripta. Malaysia Biodiversity Information System (MyBIS). https://www.mybis.gov.my/sp/9958. Downloaded on 21 October 2019.

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